Saturday, September 11, 2010

Muay Thai Kickboxing Training 9/11/2010

video
 Muay Thai Combination Training Video




Like most competitive full contact fighting sports, Muay Thai has a heavy focus on body conditioning. Muay Thai is specifically designed to promote the level of fitness and toughness required for ring competition. Training regimens include many staples of combat sport conditioning such as running, shadowboxing, rope jumping, body weight resistance exercises, medicine ball exercises, abdominal exercises, and in some cases weight training. Muay Thai practitioners typically apply Namman Muay liberally before and after their intense training sessions.
Training that is specific to a Muay Thai fighter includes training with coaches on Thai pads, focus mitts, heavy bag, and sparring. The daily training includes many rounds (3-5 minute periods broken up by a short rest, often 1–2 minutes) of these various methods of practice. Thai pad training is a cornerstone of Muay Thai conditioning which involves practicing punches, kicks, knees, and elbow strikes with a trainer wearing thick pads which cover the forearms and hands. These special pads are used to absorb the impact of the fighter’s strikes and allow the fighter to react to the attacks of the pad holder in an Alive manner. The trainer will often also wear a belly pad around the abdominal area so that the fighter can attack with straight kicks or knees to the body at anytime during the round.
Focus mitts are specific to training a fighter’s hand speed, punch combinations, timing, punching power, defense, and counter-punching and may also be used to practice elbow strikes. Heavy bag training is a conditioning and power exercise that reinforces the techniques practiced on the pads. Sparring is a means to test technique, skills, range, strategy, and timing against a partner. Sparring is often a light to medium contact exercise because competitive fighters on a full schedule are not advised to risk injury by sparring hard. Specific tactics and strategies can be trained with sparring including in close fighting, clinching and kneeing only, cutting off the ring, or using reach and distance to keep an aggressive fighter away.
Due to the rigorous training regimen (some Thai boxers fight almost every other week) professional Muay Thai fighters have relatively short careers in the ring. Many retire from competition to begin instructing the next generation of Thai fighters. It is a common myth that Thai boxing causes arthritis[citation needed]; this is not true, and it is in no way more damaging to the body than other sport or even running. Most professional Thai boxers come from the lower economic backgrounds, and the fight money (after the other parties get their cut) is sought as means of support for the fighters and their families. Very few higher economic strata Thais join the professional Muay Thai ranks; they usually either don't practice the sport or practice it only as amateur Muay Thai boxers.

Monday, May 3, 2010

Muay Thai 101 Kicking Drills and stretching method



The two most common kicks in Muay Thai are known as the teep (literally "foot jab") and the teh chiang (kicking upwards in the shape of a triangle cutting under the arm and ribs) or angle kick. The Muay Thai angle kick uses a rotational movement of the entire body and has been widely adopted by practitioners of other martial arts. It is superficially similar to a karate roundhouse kick, but omits the rotation of the lower leg from the knee used in other striking martial arts like most karate or taekwondo because like Kyukushin, Goju, and Kenpo it is done from a circular stance with the back leg just a little ways back in comparison to instinctive upper body fighting(boxing). This comes with the added risk of having the groin vulnerable at all times which is agaisnt Karate and Tae Kwon Do ideology in general except for brief moments after a kick for example. The angle kick draws its power entirely from the rotational movement of the body; the hips. It is thought many fighters use a counter rotation of the arms to intensify the power of this kick, but in actuality the power is from the hips and the arms are put in said position to get them out of the way.
If a roundhouse kick is attempted by the opponent, the Thai boxer will normally check the kick, that is he will block the kick with his own shin. Thai boxers are trained to always connect with the shin. The foot contains many fine bones and is much weaker. A fighter may end up hurting himself if he tries to strike with his foot or instep.
Muay Thai also includes other varieties of kicking such as the side kick and spinning back kick. These kicks are only used in bouts by some fighters.

Saturday, February 13, 2010

Muay Thai Shadow Boxing

 
The word muay derives from the Sanskrit mavya and Thai comes from the word Tai. Muay Thai is referred to as the "Art of Eight Limbs" because it makes use of punches, kicks, elbows and knee strikes, thus using eight "points of contact", as opposed to "two points" (fists) in Western boxing and "four points" (hands and feet) used in sport-oriented martial arts. A practitioner of Muay Thai is known as a nak muay. Western practitioners are sometimes called nak muay farang meaning foreign boxer.

Saturday, January 16, 2010

Muay Thai Jumping Spinning Kick


The Video shown above is the Muay Thai jumping spinning kick. 
This type of kick is very devastating when it lands on the target. It knocks your opponent out cold instantly.

Muay Thai - Basic Kicking Combination

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In the Video shown above. Basic Muay Thai kicking combination was demonstrated. From a roundhouse kick to spinning kick. The more you practice the better you become. So stand up and start kicking!!!

Muay Thai Training- Doing the side split


The video above shows you how the side split is done.Flexibility training should never be neglected in a fighters training.

Muay Thai - Flexibility Training


 Video shown above; demonstrates how you would do the side split. Being flexible has a lot of advantage for a muay thai fighter .You would be able to  kick the head of your opponent effortlessly. Also you won't injure your leg muscles when executing any kicking technique from your arsenal

Thursday, January 14, 2010

Muay Thai vs Wushu ( excerpt from student short film )


The Video is an excerp from an independent short film, about revenge and fighting. The fight sequence is well choreographed and can be used as your sparring reference

Tuesday, January 12, 2010

Muay Thai 102 Heavy Bag Training


This video is a Muay Thai Heavy Bag Roundhouse Kicking Drills and Roundhouse combined with spinning kick Note: The Heavy bag weights 133kg ( 300Ibs )  

Muay Thai 101 - Heavy bag Training


Like most competitive full contact fighting sports, Muay Thai has a heavy focus on body conditioning. Muay Thai is specifically designed to promote the level of fitness and toughness required for ring competition. Training regimens include many staples of combat sport conditioning such as running, shadowboxing, , weight resistance training, medicine ball exercises, abdominal exercise, and in some cases weight training. Muay Thai practitioners typically apply Namman Muay liberally before and after their intense training sessions.
Training that is specific to a Muay Thai fighter includes training with coaches on Thai pads, focus mitts, heavy bag, and sparring. The daily training includes many rounds (3-5 minute periods broken up by a short rest, often 1–2 minutes) of these various methods of practice. Thai pad training is a cornerstone of Muay Thai conditioning which involves practicing punches, kicks, knees, and elbow strikes with a trainer wearing thick pads which cover the forearms and hands. These special pads are used to absorb the impact of the fighter’s strikes and allow the fighter to react to the attacks of the pad holder. The trainer will often also wear a belly pad around the abdominal area so that the fighter can attack with straight kicks or knees to the body at anytime during the round.

Muay Thai 101 - Roundhouse Kick


 The following video is an instructional short clip for the Muay Thai Kick
How it should be properly executed at optimal natural body movements.
1. Start in a muay thai square guard position
2. Chamber the kicking leg forward at a 45 degree angle and pivot you bottom foot
3. fully extend your kicking leg and strike with the shin
4. Follow thru with a downward continuos strike , make sure the knee is facing down for optimal stiking power
5. return to your guard stance

Muay Thai is the art of eight limbs

Muay Thai 101 - Basic Knee Strike


The short clip is an instructional reference for the proper execution of the knee strike.
The knee strike is shown in a normal motion for instructional purposes..
Once the knee strike is mastered it should be executed in a fraction of a seconds for maximum effectivity
The knee strike is applied in a close range and in close quarter distance
The knee stike should be a thrusting motion upwards towards the target

The Targets of the knee stike are the following:
solar plexus
Groin
Lower abdomen

Muay Thai 101 - Basic Elbow Strike


This is a short instructional video for the proper execution of the basic elbow strike

Muay Thai 101 - Basic Punch


Shown in this short clip is the basic execution of a Muay thai boxing punch 

Muay Thai 101 - Upper Cut


Muay Thai upper cut was presented in this short instructional video clip.   

Muay Thai Technique - Hook Punch


Shown in this short clip is one of the muay thai hook punch variation .

Muay Thai



The Muay Thai angle kick uses a rotational movement of the entire body and has been widely adopted by practitioners of other martial arts.